Neighborhood Side Streets


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MEET 77TH STREET


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Pure Yoga - 204 east 77TH STREET

The street outside Pure Yoga was deafening, filled with construction sites and traffic, but as soon as I stepped inside Pure Yoga, I felt an immediate calm. Any tension fell away as I descended into the subterranean yoga complex, which smelled like a luxurious spa and was decorated with Buddha sculptures and mandalas. I met Jack Cleary, the studio’s yoga advisor, who told me that, according to one Pure Yoga member who followed the teachings of feng shui, the mandalas are the reason why the basement space feels open and healthy, rather than claustrophobic.

Either way, I barely noticed that I was underground. Instead, I simply appreciated the relaxed, wide, warmly lit hallways, ornamented with cozy, bench- and pillow-filled enclaves painted in different colors.

As we walked through the 19,000 square foot space, Jack shared the story of Pure Yoga. It began in Hong Kong in 2002 as a studio that offered a wide range of yoga instruction before coming to New York six years later. The studio on the East Side was first to open, followed by the 77th Street location in 2009. The New York locations are owned by Equinox and there are special benefits offered to Equinox gym members. There is also an Equinox spa attached to Pure Yoga on the lowest level.

Whereas only yoga that was taught, initially, Figure 4 Barre classes and PXT sessions are now available. There are also meditation classes and workshops specifically devoted to different stages of life, including pregnancy and infancy. Jack, who is now in his forties, got into yoga early on in college after hurting his back playing lacrosse. Yoga helped him significantly, and now he enjoys speaking with others who have been injured or simply those who are unsure of what kind of yoga would be best for their needs. He seems to fully appreciate the opportunity to guide men and women of all ages in the right form of exercise.

Jack showed me the schedules for each of the six studios, which included everything from advanced Hot Yoga to gentle beginner classes. “We run the whole gamut,” Jack stated. He led me around to the different rooms, pointing out the natural anti-bacterial cork floors that designated the Hot Yoga rooms. In every room, mats are already provided and are laid down prior to class. These mats are then immediately put into their washing machines, a practice, Jack informed me, that is not found in many studios. Pure Yoga went above and beyond in many other ways, too, such as providing cool Eucalyptus-infused towels.

As we continued to walk, Jack said that occasionally members will take a break from Pure Yoga to try other studios, but they almost always return. Jack noted that very few other places offer the facilities that they do, including the impeccably clean showers and changing rooms (stocked with Kiehl’s products).

Pure Yoga is perfect for those who like to mix up their routine and try different schools of yoga. Benefits offered by Pure Yoga include a one-time beginner drop-in fee of $21 as well as access to various workshops and trips. When I visited in 2015, there were signs for a workshop with Diamond Dallas, a pro-wrestler-turned-yogi, as well as advertisements for a group retreat to Nicaragua. At the back of the space, I took note of the private yoga studios for both members and non-members, including a Hot Yoga room. Jack then mentioned that he sees a lot of members, especially those who are free-lancers or moms, using the hallway spaces as a quiet place to work. “It’s a little getaway,” he said. “Many people think we’re a normal yoga studio when they pass by on the street.” After exploring the many different facilities, I was convinced that Pure Yoga is far more than a “normal yoga studio.”

“Pure is a place where people who are passionate about yoga can find a place where they can grow,” Jack said, before introducing me to Alexandra Seijo, the studio’s General Manager. She agreed, adding that both members and instructors can find new forms of yoga to experiment with and embrace. With such a wide breadth of scheduling, there is always something for someone to take at any time of the day. Alexandra went on to say that many yogis end up falling in love with a new form of yoga, thanks to Pure: “They may not even know what they’re looking for, but they’ll find it here.”

For more photos and side streets, go to sideways.nyc.


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