UWS dog “pawtee” raises thousands for no-kill shelter


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Party celebrates daycare’s fifth year in operation


Photos



  • Camp Canine founder Tania Isenstein, right, and longtime Muddy Paws Rescue volunteer Hartje Andresen pose with a $2,000 check to benefit Muddy Paws. Photo: Razi Syed




  • Ready for cake at Camp Canine's "pawtee" on April 28. The Upper West Side doggy daycare hosted to benefit Muddy Paws Rescue, a local no-kill shelter. Photo: Razi Syed




  • Two dogs dressed in their best at Camp Canine's "pawtee" to benefit Muddy Paws Rescue. Photo: Razi Syed



By Razi Syed

Around 60 dogs dressed in their best spent an afternoon munching on doggy cake, drinking “champagne” and playing in non-toxic, bacon-scented bubbles at an Upper West Side doggy daycare on April 28.

Camp Canine, owned by Tania Isenstein, threw its dog “pawtee” to honor the anniversary of its fifth year in operation and to benefit Muddy Paws Rescue, a no-kill shelter based in Brooklyn.

Half the proceeds from the $55 party fee, about $2,000, was donated to Muddy Paws. Four dogs at the party came from Muddy Paws and are available for adoption.

Isenstein walked away from a career as lawyer on Wall Street to buy Camp Canine, located on 73rd Street between Columbus and Central Park West.

“I left [Wall Street] because it wasn’t fulfilling to me,” Isenstein said. “I decided the one thing I love most in life is dogs. I live down the block from here, so I purchased it and dedicated to make it the best place it can be for our clients.”

The party was held in three separate shifts to prevent overcrowding. The pups sipped “champagne” or chicken broth and ate dog-safe cake.

Isenstein said Camp Canine has helped rescue around 150 dogs by taking fosters from high-kill shelters and socializing them so they can be adopted.

Longtime Muddy Paws volunteer Hartje Andresen said the nonprofit’s workers drive down to Alabama and Kentucky, and bring back to New York dogs that are on the list to be euthanized.

“We find new permanent homes here for them,” Andresen said. “We’re only able to do that because a tight network of volunteers, fosters and a really supportive community that work together, hand-in-hand, to save these dogs’ lives. Camp Canine is a group that fosters, helps out and has been incredibly supportive.”



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